The New Jersey Boys to perform the hits of the Four Seasons and Showaddywaddy

The New Jersey Boys will be performing one last show at the Malborough Village Hall after a number of shows which all sold out. This last show will be held on the 30th of June. Gary Gould and his son-in-law are the main people behind the show and they had performed many of the hits in Costa Brave in Spain but when they came back to the UK in 2008, they realised that the public was very much interested in seeing a Jersey Boys show.

The duo put in a lot of effort to ensure they have their stamp on the family show following the record breaking performance of the Jersey Boys production by the West End. Gary Gould is an all-round entertainer and he has been in the music industry for twenty five years. His performance style combines audience participation and whimsical humour.

Another musician in the group is the Icelander Einar Vestmann who was raised in Sweden and he has gotten many standing ovations thanks to his amazing vocal range and unbelievable falsetto. He is a classically-trained musician. Another performer in the group is Ricky Lee White from Plymouth. The vocalist has performed in a production of ‘Oliver!’ which was produced by West End and he is excellent at providing support with solo spots and harmonies. The last member of the group is the singer Tom Giles. He is the latest addition to the show and he has blended well into it. The popular show now has a very committed group of followers.

There will also be an amazing rock and roll band playing in Malborough during that evening as a bonus. That is Showaddywaddy so be prepared for lots of fun when you come. Tickets can be bought from the Post Office in Malborough, Salcombe Tourist Information Centre and Kingsbridge Tourist Information Centre. The tickets are going for £16. You can also visit www.wegottickets.com if you wish to get yours online.

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